International Disarmament Institute News

April 1, 2017
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Positive Obligations in a Treaty to Prohibit Nuclear Weapons: UN Side Event

Director of Pace University’s International Disarmament Institute Matthew Bolton chaired a side event on positive obligations at the UN 31 March 2017 during the first round of negotiations on a nuclear weapons ban treaty.

The panel featured Richard Moyes, Managing Director of Article 36, presenting research on stockpile destruction; Bonnie Docherty of the Harvard Law School International Human Rights Clinic presenting research on environmental remediation; and Erin Hunt of Mines Action Canada offering insight into how victim assistance provisions might function.

Dr. Bolton highlighted research by the International Disarmament Institute on possible educational provisions in the treaty. In preparation for the side event he also published an article in the Nuclear Ban Daily on precedents for positive obligations in humanitarian disarmament treaties.

For further information on the side event, read the write-up from Article 36’s Elizabeth Minor.

 

March 30, 2017
by mbolton
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Op-Ed: The Case for Positive Obligations in the Nuclear Weapons Ban Treaty

Bonnie Docherty (left) of Harvard Law School’s International Human Rights Clinic and Matthew Bolton (right), Director of Pace University’s International Disarmament Institute on a panel regarding positive obligations in the proposed nuclear weapons ban treaty at the UN in March 2017.

Republished from Nuclear Ban Daily, 1(4), pp. 2-3.

The case for the nuclear weapons ban treaty has been rooted in the traditions of international humanitarian law and humanitarian disarmament law, which bind states to acknowledging the suffering caused by war, establishing prohibitions on inhuman methods and means of warfare and taking positive harm-limiting measures.

The Geneva Conventions – the most well-known treaties forming the core of international humanitarian law – prohibit states from targeting civilians, wounded soldiers, prisoners of war, the shipwrecked and relief workers. But they also commit states to a positive “duty to ensure respect” for the conventions (Common Article 1). And they mandate the International Committee of the Red Cross and the National Societies to provide relief and to raise awareness of humanitarian norms.

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March 24, 2017
by mbolton
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Disarmament Education and the Nuclear Weapons Ban Treaty

 

Gathering in New York this year, the majority of the world’s countries aim to negotiate a treaty banning nuclear weapons (meeting 27-31 March and 15 June to 7 July 2017). Deeply concerned with the catastrophic humanitarian consequences of nuclear detonations – whether intentional or accidental – the UN General Assembly called for a new, humanitarian approach to nuclear disarmament. Humanitarian disarmament treaties (such as the 1907 Hague Conventions, Landmine and Cluster Munition Bans, and Explosive Remnants of War Protocol) differ from other arms control and nonproliferation treaties. In addition to having a humanitarian framing and strong prohibitions, they often include positive provisions such as educational and awareness-raising measures that encourage states, civil society and international organizations to ensure respect for the norms set by the treaties and limit harm caused by the weapons they address.

In this two-pager, Director of the Pace University’s International Disarmament Institute Matthew Bolton makes the case for including educational provisions as one such set of harm-limiting positive provisions in the nuclear weapons ban treaty text.

December 28, 2016
by mbolton
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Second ATT Academy East Africa Workshop

Participants in the ATT Academy, Lake Nakuru National Park. Photo: Control Arms.

The second ATT Academy training took place from 05-08 December 2016 at Lake Nakuru Lodge, Kenya and focused on ensuring deeper understanding of the Treaty’s provisions and their practical application. Over four days, participants explored themes relevant to the sub-region including Wildlife Crime, Pastoralist Conflict, Tackling Gender Based Violence and Importer Obligations. Excellent expert speakers, group discussions, homework assignments and hypothetical exercises ensured positive engagement among participants. Field visits with the Kenyan Wildlife Services (KWS) rangers provided participants with deeper understanding of the challenges they face in preventing poaching and preserving wildlife due to the proliferation of illicit weapons in the region.

The Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) Academy brings a new approach to learning about the ATT and its implementation. It provides an in-depth and tailored learning opportunity to carefully selected participants, all of whom engage directly with the ATT in their work as government, or as part of civil society. It also provides an opportunity to explore linkages to other relevant arms, security development instruments, and enables discussion and analysis of regionally-specific issues, such as the link between wildlife crime and small arms proliferation.

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October 15, 2016
by mbolton
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Pace University Student Addresses UN General Assembly First Committee on Disarmament Education

Pace University student Rachel Salcedo ’17 addressing the United Nations General Assembly First Committee on disarmament education.

“Education can help empower the greater participation of youth, women, survivors of violence, and people from the Global South in peace and security policymaking,” Rachel Salcedo ’17, peace and justice studies major, told the United Nations General Assembly First Committee in a statement on disarmament and nonproliferation education.

She called attention to UN Security Council Resolution 2250 on Youth, Peace, and Security, which calls for “inclusive representation of youth in decision-making…for the prevention and resolution of conflict” and “quality education for peace.”

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August 16, 2016
by mbolton
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Pace University Recognized for “Growing Role in Disarmament Education”

Pace University was featured in UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon’s report on “disarmament and non-proliferation education” in August 2016, which calls on “schools in all countries to inform and empower young people to become agents of peace by helping them to mobilize, act and promote the importance of disarmament and non-proliferation.”

The report states that Pace is “playing a growing role in disarmament education”, highlighting the Model UN program, its new Peace and Justice Studies major, research by Pace faculty, Disarmament Forums hosted at Pace and a UN-funded project providing training to East African officials on the Arms Trade Treaty.

“We are proud to see the UN recognize Pace for the excellent work it does in educating students in global citizenship,” said Dr. Matthew Bolton, Director of the International Disarmament Institute at Pace University in New York City.

Pace University’s full submission to the UN is available here.

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